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Category Archives: Faith-based malfeasance

Columbus Inquirer, September 24, 1908. “Possessed of unlimited resources for the gratification of his pleasure”—hot dog! This is another item ripe for adaptation for a handlebar-mustache version of Law & Order. The episode would cold-open with an Italian balloon vendor stepping into the bushes to relieve himself and tripping over the murdered monsignor, natch. Read more.

Philadelphia Inquirer, May 6, 1910. Further to the erotic adventures of Oom the Omnipotent. Read More »

I’m shooting for second Beard as a food blogger and PR trouble shooter.

Grand Forks Herald, May 8, 1910. The Edwardian era had its garden variety libertines and seducers, but Oom the Omnipotent was operating on an entirely separate plane. Though it was also a pretty crowded plane, according to this reportage. Read more.

Two items of apocalyptic import in this week’s Chicago Reader, here and here.

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Atlanta Constitution, January 22, 1890. In colonial New England, the birth of such a monster would typically inspire suspicions that some man had had carnal relations with the mother. The freakish progeny would be scrutinized for clues as to the identity of the malefactor. The penalty for bestiality was hanging, but first the condemned man would have to watch his animal consort killed before his eyes. And no, I’m not making this shit up.

cartoon violenceChicago Tribune, December 6, 1900. A straight-shooting Southern pastor lays down his life for decency. Of course there’s nothing like a well-wrought cartoon to turn cultural warfare into the real thing.

wmbNew York Times, February 15, 1899. Here’s some evergreen political doggerel for all you protest cats. Read More »

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